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Adobe Photoshop Family

32 Messages

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554 Points

Sun, Dec 24, 2017 9:57 AM

Implemented

1

Selective edit: option to turn circle oval selection tool

The selective editing tools are very nice. However, software offer the option to turn an oval selection under a angle. In Lr it is possible with the three horizontal lines, not with the circular selection tool. Often faces are captured under an angle an it would be helpful if we could adapt the selection to cover the face to quickly make adjustments. It is possible to use the painting tool, but it takes more time and is less convenient.

Responses

Champion

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492 Messages

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9K Points

3 years ago

If you're talking about the Radial filter, then you can rotate it quite easily....hover the cursor over the line of the filter (but not any of the 4 anchor points which are using for stretching/compressing the filter) and the cursor will change to an angled two-headed pointer. Click and drag in any direction to rotate the filter.

Champion

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3.3K Messages

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58K Points

3 years ago

If you are talking about the Elliptical Marquee Tool: After you've made the oval selection, go to menu 'Select - Transform Selection'. That will give you the option to rotate your elliptical selection, or transform it in any other way you want.

Johan W. Elzenga,

http://www.johanfoto.com

32 Messages

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554 Points

3 years ago

Thanks both, it works! I tried it all the time with my finger pressing on one of the anchor point. That is not the way to do it. You have to hold it in between the dots on the line, actual quite similar to what you do with the linear gradient filter. I am really happy it works well. I was talking about the iPad app. I will try the Mac version later.

Champion

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3.3K Messages

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58K Points

3 years ago

Ah, I missed you were talking about Lightroom, because there is no 'circular selection tool' in Lightroom. I thought you were talking about Photoshop. In Lightroom you can indeed rotate the radial filter by dragging between the anchor points. 

Johan W. Elzenga,

http://www.johanfoto.com

32 Messages

 • 

554 Points

3 years ago

It is called radial gradient