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52 Messages

 • 

736 Points

Wed, Mar 21, 2012 6:52 AM

Lightroom: LR4 Brightness adjust - 'tone curve' - unweildy

I've been experimenting with adjusting brightness using the tonal curve.

I'd like to suggest Adobe brings back brightness adjust for two reasons:

1 Tonal adjust simply does not work as well as the old brightness adjust and - potentially because of the litany of bugs in LR4, is sluggish and requires far more adjustments to achieve what 'brightness' did with a couple of pulls...

2 I edit between 200 - 600 images a week. I don't want to have to switch out of basic to Tonal adjust everytime I need to tweak brightness. It makes no sense at all ("it will create better pictures" I hear you say... possibly, but it takes significantly longer.

Bring it back please and let the user decide which is the better solution.

Responses

677 Messages

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8.7K Points

9 years ago

For all practical purposes the new Exposure is the same as old Brightness.

52 Messages

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736 Points

9 years ago

You obviously don't understand the differences between brightness and exposure.

52 Messages

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736 Points

9 years ago

Exposure Sets the overall image brightness, with a greater effect in the high values.
...
Brightness Adjusts image brightness, mainly affecting midtones.

Have a read: http://photo.stackexchange.com/questi...

http://lightroomkillertips.com/2010/l...

And if you still conclude that the exposure is the same, then you've missed my point entirely. I need control over my midtones and you don't get that with the exposure slider.

4.5K Messages

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76.3K Points

+brightness = +exposure -highlights

The good news: brightening your photo this way will not wash it out.
The bad news: it takes 2 sliders, not one.

No need to use tone curve for brightening in Lr4 - save it for the trickier stuff.

Richard, - I think it's trickier editing photos with Lr4, but after a while it's actually considerably faster for most photos, since tone curve is actually less necessary, and most photos can be adjusted in just a few iterations of the basics. Did I already mention that I think it's a bit tricky to learn? - this link may help:

http://forums.adobe.com/message/42590...

52 Messages

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736 Points

Vheers Rob, I'll have a look at this fella. I'm all for improvements but not at the expense of time - which I don't have. Appreciate the link mate, I'll let you know how I get on.

4.5K Messages

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76.3K Points

It took me a while to become really proficient with it, but you may get the hang more quickly.

I'll be standing by for your report...

R

52 Messages

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736 Points

Quick one Rob... Just for 'basic' brightening, which method do you use?

Can you do a quick 1 2 3?

Appreciate it fella

;)

4.5K Messages

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76.3K Points

Not sure I'm the best person for a quick answer - I prefer the long and drawn out variety. But, maybe it will be therapeutic for me to try:

If the basic problem is it's too dim, then certainly start with:

+exposure

if that makes the highlights too bright, then

-highlights

. OK, so far good, except I personally don't like the muted look that the highlights have by default, so I typically toss in some:

+whites

. Then, if that makes it too bright, try some

-exposure, and/or
-highlights

And if it makes the shadows are then too dim, then

+shadows

maybe toss in some

+contrast

and some

-highlights
+shadows

to go with it, if you want to "contain" it some.

Adjust blacks if need be. If they need a lot of adjustment, then you may have to go through everything again, otherwise you're good to go!...

Summary:
========
To brighten without blowing out highlights:

+exposure
-highlights

but the rest is sure to follow in most cases.

And, if you want the opposite, then do the opposite...

PV2012 in a nutshell:
--------------------------
* exposure sets the mids, not the highs or lows - those are set by highlights and shadows.
* contrast to taste...
* blacks to anchor
* +whites so highlights look good.
Perhaps biggest tip: highlights slider is primary slider for recovery - not the whites slider!

-highlights as necessary.
-whites (only) if necessary.

Similarly, shadows is biggest "filler" along with exposure.
blacks slider best for setting clip point. There are exceptions to this when blacks slider may need to take a more key role in "filling", but you gotta read my "forum blog book" for all that.

Rob