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10 Messages

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234 Points

Sat, Feb 10, 2018 8:46 PM

2

Lightroom Classic: Save spot removal separately

Not every photo from a days shooting needs spot removal, usually it is just the sky which can vary hugely from image to image. Applying a blanket sync to all photo's would therefore entail the removal of a number of patches in each photo which is about as tedious as removing the spots in the first place.
What I would like to see is the ability to save the spot removal settings but as a separate set to the normal 'Copy Setttings'. Often I will want to copy other settings apart from the spots but can't do this without destroying my saved spot removal. of course I could go back to an image with all the spots removed and save it again but that is so clunky it doesn't bear thinking about.

Responses

475 Messages

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10.5K Points

3 years ago

Hi Philip

I want to be sure that you are aware of the various ways you can copy develop settings in Lightroom. At least from my perspective, I can't imagine needing your suggested feature.

When I have a bunch of photos that I want to apply the same, or similar, develop settings to, I work on one until it is finished, and then use the "Sync..." button to apply the settings to the others (from the most selected photo to the other selected photos). There is an option in this to choose which settings to apply.



Another way to achieve your goal would be to spot each photo separately, then select them all and turn on "Auto Sync". Then all subsequent edits that you apply to the displayed photo will also be applied to the others.

You are right to be wary of blindly applying the same spotting to more than one photo. I have often found that Lightroom duplicated a little twig or other feature when applying spotting from one photo to another, and I never copy spotting between photos without checking each one carefully afterwards.

1.3K Messages

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22.5K Points

3 years ago

Are you talking about real Lightroom which is now called Lightroom "Classic", in which case I share Alan's puzzlement at your suggestion.

Or are you talking about the new "Lightroom CC" which is like Lightroom Mobile but running on PC/Mac?

Champion

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5.9K Messages

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104K Points

3 years ago

I think I'm with you. So you basically want multiple clipboards, right? So another scenario is where you're editing photos from multiple cameras, and you want to save 2 different WB settings to paste?

Victoria Bampton a.k.a. The Lightroom Queen

www.lightroomqueen.com

Author of Adobe Lightroom Classic - The Missing FAQ and Adobe Lightroom - Edit Like a Pro books.

137 Messages

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2K Points

Yes saving à set of spot removals would be useful

Champion

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3.2K Messages

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56.8K Points

3 years ago

H'm. The way I read it is that he never really looked at the 'Synchronize Settings' dialog and didn't realize that you can simply uncheck Spot Removal in this box... Or uncheck everything but Spot Removal.

Johan W. Elzenga,

http://www.johanfoto.com

10 Messages

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234 Points

3 years ago

Victoria hit the nail on the head. I am well aware of auto sync Alan/Johan however I am not talking about multiple shots of the same or similar scene but multiple scenes from the same day or days. Different lighting, colour temp etc. - same spots. Auto sync is not always appropriate as in most cases each photo needs different processing.
What I want to do is have a 'Spot removal' saved that when doesn't get blown away when I have an image that I want to look the same as a previous shot.

Champion

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3.2K Messages

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56.8K Points

I'm sorry, but I still don't understand. If you uncheck Spot Removal in the dialog, you can sync anything else but leave your spot removal in place. That is exactly what you ask for in your last sentence: To sync develop settings between two (or more) images, without changing the spot removal in any of them.

And you can do the opposite too. If you uncheck everything but Spot Removal, you can sync spot removal between two (or more) images without changing anything else.

Johan W. Elzenga,

http://www.johanfoto.com

Champion

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5.9K Messages

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104K Points

It's not a question of overwriting the spots on the photos themselves. It's being able to keep two sets of data stored.

Imagine trying to paint a wall in red and green... if you only had one brush, you'd have to keep washing it out and dipping it back in the right color paintpot, whereas if you had two brushes, you could keep one red and one green. 

Philip wants to keep one "paintbrush" with just his dust spot removal, and another one available for copying other settings. 

It's a request I've heard numerous times in the past when editing photos from multiple cameras that each have slightly different WB values.

Victoria Bampton a.k.a. The Lightroom Queen

www.lightroomqueen.com

Author of Adobe Lightroom Classic - The Missing FAQ and Adobe Lightroom - Edit Like a Pro books.

Champion

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3.2K Messages

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56.8K Points

Agreed. When he said "What I want to do is have a 'Spot removal' saved that when doesn't get blown away when I have an image that I want to look the same as a previous shot" I read that as blowing the spot removal of the image away. Now I realise he meant blowing it away from the copied settings in memory.

The solution would be to be able to save spot removal as (part of) a develop preset. 

Johan W. Elzenga,

http://www.johanfoto.com

475 Messages

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10.5K Points

Actually, one could create virtual copies with various sets of spot treatments, name them according to which spots are included, and then synchronize develop settings from those photos. It might be nearly as easy as a develop preset. And when you have spotted all the photos from a shoot, just delete the virtual copies -- since you are sure to have different spots on your next time out. If you can remember to take a picture of the blue sky at the end of your shoot (after your last time changing lenses), it might even be relatively straightforward to do this. (Never, ever have I ever been able to remember to take a picture of the blue sky after a long day behind a camera!)

799 Messages

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11.5K Points

3 years ago

Are these spots on your sensor? You could just clean your sensor before a big shoot?

475 Messages

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10.5K Points

"We can't all, and some of us don't. That's all there is to it." (Eeyore)

137 Messages

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2K Points

That’s not the point. The point is you can come back from a shoot with 1000 images and have a lot of dust spots on them all. Some need 5 identical spots to be removed, some might need seven fixes, some only 3. It would be handy to be able to recall saved sets of dust spots and only have to tweak one or two when needed. Copying all spots all the time is about as destructive as leaving them all to fix manually. It takes a lot of time in the workflow.

Champion

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3.2K Messages

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56.8K Points

Agreed, that would be handy. Unfortunately, spot removal cannot be saved as a develop preset.

Johan W. Elzenga,

http://www.johanfoto.com