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19 Messages

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272 Points

Mon, Nov 30, 2020 5:06 PM

Not planned

1

Camera Raw: Save raw at lower resolution

I have a large megapixel camera which I use for all my shooting. However for certain shoots or for certain images, I do not need my camera's full resolution image stored in raw, because it occupies significant space (both locally and for backup purposes). 


Why is there no feature to save at a reduced pixel dimension?

Responses

1.9K Messages

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22.8K Points

2 months ago

You'll have to take that up with your camera manufacturer. It's not something Adobe raw converters are able to do as you request. Adobe treats proprietary raw data as read only. 

Author “Color Management for Photographers"

19 Messages

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272 Points

I think you mean "Adobe". I certainly don't have the power or means to negotiate with camera manufacturers.

I mean we should just assume Adobe is "giving the nod" to disk manufacturers and backup services, by not introducing such an obvious consumer-friendly feature. A gesture of kindness, from one monopoly to another ;)

1.9K Messages

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22.8K Points

I think you mean "Adobe".

What I mean is what I wrote: It's not something Adobe raw converters are able to do as you request. Adobe treats proprietary raw data as read only. 

Adobe can barely find camera manufacturers to supply them with beta's of proprietary raws before camera release so we don't have to wait for updates to process that data. I don't think they will find much progress asking them to alter the resolution of their raw data. 

You are the customer. Ask the people who you paid good money for a camera to consider this feature. Again, it's not something Adobe or any other 3rd party raw converter can provide for you. 

I mean we should just assume Adobe is "giving the nod" to disk manufacturers and backup services, by not introducing such an obvious consumer-friendly feature. A gesture of kindness, from one monopoly to another ;)

I go out of my way not to assume. 

Author “Color Management for Photographers"

19 Messages

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272 Points

I go out of my way not to assume. 


You are okay with getting taken for a ride... gotcha

232 Messages

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4.6K Points

Nobody is getting "taken for a ride". What Rodney is telling you is that raw files are a specific size set in camera. There are some cameras that allow you to set the size, most do not. It sounds like you need a camera that has that capability.

--Steve Gandy - stevegandy.com/photography

19 Messages

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272 Points

Sure, buy another camera. "Hello monopoly, we're here to worship you with ever more cash" lol

A simple software solution would suffice

(edited)

4 Messages

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40 Points

2 months ago

Interesting idea.  However RAW data come directly from sensor along with some metadata about lens, setting, location etc.... By itself not human perceivable as an "Image"- it needs to be processed.  So the only practical way to export a smaller version that "image", the data would be to process and scale it. At which point it basically what happens when you shoot direct to JPG + scaling.

I guess one could perhap make an argument for in camera or software conversion to some uncompressed / or lossless format high bit count (16 or 32 bit), TIFF...  But that would not be much better than just shooting a max quality JPEG as a first generation master. (I.E. Not recompressing derivative generations. )  

19 Messages

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272 Points

@James Stuart Johnson Max Quality JPEG is one way to approach it, if your workflow has no need to access to any RAW-only adjustment

85 Messages

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1.8K Points

I think it is an important point that the raw data is not really an image the way that a jpeg or tiff file is.  It is a Bayer array.  I think shrinking the pixel dimensions of a raw file would be far more complex than doing it to a jpeg or tiff file.  To the best of my knowledge camera manufacturers do not provide Adobe or other companies with the spec for their raw file format.  So the raw file format needs to be reversed engineered which is ok if you just want to read the format.

4 Messages

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40 Points

No matter how you approach it, you lose data to save space. Do you want half the sensor data or all the data converted to 32bit and lossy compressed at 80%-100% compression.  There's always a trade off, depending what you needs are and where the acceptable loss is applied.


Like everything else, it comes down to: Speed, Quality or Cost, you can only pick two...

(edited)

Champion

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3.3K Messages

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58.1K Points

2 months ago

You can convert the raw files to DNG with Adobe DNG Converter and then use lossy compression.

Johan W. Elzenga,

http://www.johanfoto.com

19 Messages

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272 Points

By default the DNG lossless format can save up to 30% depending on the image. DNG would be the perfect solution if they simply build an image resizing feature as part of DNG. See below it remains disabled unless you select a supported format.

(edited)

424 Messages

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8.5K Points

2 months ago

I agree it could on occasion be useful to produce DNGs at a lower res than the original camera raw file.  For instance - animation/film production - to be able to go straight to 4k DNG would be great for Timelapse.

(edited)

This is my signature.  There are many like it, but this one is mine.

1.9K Messages

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22.8K Points

Absolutely doable.

But it is not camera raw sensor data and one can render a lower resolution variation in a DNG but a TIFF provides the same thing.

Author “Color Management for Photographers"

424 Messages

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8.5K Points

Not asking for undemosaiced camera raw sensor data, asking for a DNG with all the metadata/maker notes in.  It would be a handy feature even with caveats. 

This is my signature.  There are many like it, but this one is mine.

1.9K Messages

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22.8K Points

Not asking for undemosaiced camera raw sensor data...

The OP is. 

Author “Color Management for Photographers"

424 Messages

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8.5K Points

Sorry, I thought he was just asking to save it at reduced image resolution.

This is my signature.  There are many like it, but this one is mine.

4 Messages

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40 Points

I hadn't considered timelapse.  Adding the ability to export directly to various high bit depth flavors of DPX or Open EXR directly from Bridge though camera raw, would be useful for those working with image sequences. Both Premiere and After Fx support DPX and some Open EXR flavors.

(edited)