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Adobe Photoshop Family

990 Messages

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16.7K Points

Fri, May 10, 2019 2:32 PM

Not a problem

Older versions of Creative Cloud apps no longer available for download

Responses

170 Messages

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4.4K Points

a year ago

Very sad to see Adobe in its current state of affairs. The left hand doesn't seem to know what the right hand is doing. Will be switching to ON1 in the near future. R.I.P. LR

594 Messages

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11.2K Points

a year ago

Hi,

There's something very ambiguous in Adobe's statements. Until the latest version of Lightoom "perpetual license" , the binaries were actually the same. At least, I could verify this for some versions that were installed at my photo club. Just the behavior was different depending on whether the user entered a perpetual license number (which was called "serializing") or if the user was connected through an Adobe ID.

So, if there's a licensing problem with a technology used in the code, this must be about a feature that was only available with the CC "behavior". Audio ? I'm not aware of any difference in this area.

 

--
Patrick
www.ppphoto.fr
Hamburg ist der wahre Grund warum
Kompassnadeln nach Norden zeigen.

40 Messages

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952 Points

Adobe has said that perpetual licenses are not affected, across the board... Apparently only subscription licenses are impacted, for a number of different programs.

Champion

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5.1K Messages

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92.8K Points

"Adobe has said that perpetual licenses are not affected"

Do you have a link?  Victoria and Laura are confident about this, and we shouldn't doubt them, but I haven't seen any clarity directly from Adobe.

Champion

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5.1K Messages

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92.8K Points

It's certainly possible that Adobe has some sort of agreement with, say, Dolby, to terminate licenses and withdraw old subscription versions but not old perpetual versions, the former being practically feasible, the latter obviously not.

Champion

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174 Messages

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3.9K Points

I appreciate that you want absolute clarity, John, so that we're sure we are passing on correct info to customers. We did get that word directly from Adobe that perpetual versions aren't affected. The customer letter also speaks specifically and only to Creative Cloud versions. Either the letter didn't get reviewed by anyone who knew how the CC versions of LR are/were referred to, or there was some legal reason for specifying them as they did.

Champion

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174 Messages

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3.9K Points

Note that download availability and licensing are two different issues, and unfortunately the fact that they are blended together in practice makes this more confusing. The older perpetual versions, even though they are authorized, are also not available on Adobe.com for download, but they can be accessed by contacting Customer Support (or in some cases they can be downloaded from the customer's Account section on Adobe.com)

7 Messages

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180 Points

a year ago

This reply was created from a merged topic originally titled I'm really curious if there is truth that folks using older versions of creative....

I'm really curious if there is truth to the article referenced here  (https://9to5mac.com/2019/05/14/older-creative-cloud-apps/ ) which states that people using older versions of creative cloud apps could get sued.  What's that about?  I'm a subscriber so it doesn't affect me but what would the older apps constitute? 

1.5K Messages

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20.1K Points

This seems a lot about nothing. It only affects CC (subscription users). Updates are free, part of the subscription. Adobe wants you to update to avoid the Dolby stuff. 
The other question is, did/can Adobe cease the older software to run? Seems they can't and are telling customers who demand using the old product that they may be liable but can or does Dolby have any clue this is happening? Seems not. So while Adobe has warned some folks who refuse to update their products, there's not much either they or Dolby can do. Hence the warning. From the article I provided:

"Some users are getting messages from Adobe warning they could be at “risk of potential claims of infringement by third parties” should they continue to use outdated versions of their apps."

So some users could be at risk. Some users should consider just updating their software. I see nothing that states this is a Mac only issue FWIW. If issue is even the right word to be using here.

Author “Color Management for Photographers"

Champion

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5.1K Messages

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92.8K Points

If you were continuing to use one of the older subscription versions of, say, Media Encoder, for which Adobe withdrew the license, then you would be using unlicensed Dolby software, and Dolby could in theory sue you for copyright infringement. But as a practical matter, it seems very unlikely Dolby would go after most individual customers -- it wouldn't make economic or marketing sense.

1.5K Messages

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20.1K Points

 it seems very unlikely Dolby would go after most individual customers
Or even know they are using that old software. A big 'nothing' really; just update as you can as a subscriber.

Author “Color Management for Photographers"

990 Messages

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16.7K Points

Small customers with no money aren't at risk. But a large organization that could get turned in, yes they would potentially be at risk of a lawsuit.

594 Messages

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11.2K Points

a year ago

Hi,

I think there's more about all these access restrictions to older software. At the beginning of this week, the Adobe FTP server on which all the older versions of many Adobe products were stored has been completely purged. These were all "perpetual license" versions. If the access restrictions are only limited to the CC versions why did they suppress this facility ? This was very useful when someone needed to reinstall an old version of a product.

Moreover, download.adobe.com now returns a 404. Why ? Now, the only way to (re)install or try a product is via the desperately buggy CC thing.

Don't tell me that these changes are for the user's benefit.

 

--
Patrick
www.ppphoto.fr
Hamburg ist der wahre Grund warum
Kompassnadeln nach Norden zeigen.

Champion

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2.2K Messages

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36.9K Points

Patrick, this restriction probably also applies to the older perpetual licensed products as part of the ongoing litigation. You can still access CS and Elements installer downloads directly if the products were purchased on the Adobe Store. If they were purchased from a retailer and you have the license key number you will need to contact Contact Customer Care.

Here's how to access the installer downloads for products purchased on the Adobe Store.

https://helpx.adobe.com/x-productkb/global/find-downloaded-file-app.html

I tired the suggestions at the above link and was unable to find the download links for my own CS6 products. It appears for some user accounts the links are there, but in a different place.
If you can't see the download links for the product orders in your account try the below procedure, which works for me. Keep in mind you may have orders on multiple account logins. I have three different logins used to purchase products on the Adobe Store over the past 20 years.
HOW DO I FIND MY CS & ELEMENTS PRODUCT DOWNLOAD FILES?

1) Use the following URL to find your product order: account.adobe.com

2) Make sure to login with the account that was used to place the order. You may need to sign out and login again if your current login account is different.

3) If you don't see your order click on the 'Register a product' link. Next click on the 'Order history' link in the upper left-hand corner

3) Find the order that needs the download files and click on the 'ORDER #' link.

4) Finally click on the 'Downloads and serial numbers' link to access the installer and other associated files for this product.

Champion

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5.1K Messages

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92.8K Points

a year ago

"this restriction probably also applies to the older perpetual licensed products as part of the ongoing litigation."

I don't think perpetual licenses are part of the legal dispute.  According to the press reports, Dolby claims Adobe is short-changing them on subscription licenses -- if a user downloaded Premiere Pro and Lightroom from their Creative Cloud subscription, Adobe would only pay Dolby for one license, not two, as Dolby thinks they should.

Maybe there's something in the legal dispute concerning perpetual licenses that hasn't been reported by the press?  But I haven't seen any hints.

Perhaps more likely is that Adobe has removed the perpetual versions as part of its new overall policy of providing access only to the last two major versions of all apps that are now part of the Creative Cloud. Given Adobe's motivations for the two-major-versions policy (see below), and given that Adobe employees can't get the perpetual-versus-subscription naming straight, maybe they just found it easier, for customer support and for simpler marketing communications, to remove all prior versions from the open downloads. 

So why the two-major-versions policy? On 4/2, Adobe published a help article saying they had removed Dolby technology from all CC apps. Presumably they did this anticipating they'd be unable to negotiate a new Dolby license at acceptable cost.  

But what should they have done about older subscription versions of those apps?  They could have pushed out patches to all of them removing Dolby technology. But that could be costly, especially if their internal release engineering isn't robust enough to patch reliably major versions that are several years old without extensive QA. So I'm guessing that, as a compromise, Adobe decided to only patch the two most recent subscription versions and withdraw access and "deauthorize" (whatever that really means) previous subscription versions.

Going forward, Adobe could decide that they would make all future versions available indefinitely, since they won't include Dolby technology. But I'm guessing that Adobe sees this as an opportunity to reduce support costs.

Note that in their customer letters, Adobe explicitly indicates they patched LR CC 2015.14, releasing a new build on 3/19. (Downloads of LR CC 2015.14 prior to that date are "unauthorized".) This is one of several unexplained exceptions to the two-major-versions policy.

1.5K Messages

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20.1K Points

a year ago

I don't think perpetual licenses are part of the legal dispute. 

Correct, it's the opposite. 

Author “Color Management for Photographers"

Champion

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2.2K Messages

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36.9K Points

I don't think perpetual licenses are part of the legal dispute.
I totally agree that the perpetual licenses are NOT part of the legal dispute as far as usage by the original person who purchased the license. The plaintiff may have asked Adobe as part of the litigation to insure only the original purchaser has access to the product's installer files. This limits the availability of the installers to the original purchaser and helps to prevent pirating by downloading it and using the many hacks available to illegally activate the product. That may have been the tipping point to get Dolby to agree to back off on the older perpetual license product. ALL of the talk here is merely speculation as Adobe has provided no real details about WHO or WHAT the litigation is about.